Meet Sergeant John Moore, Company B, 16th North Carolina.

By Frederick Walton, 6th NCST Historian

Meet Sergeant John Moore, Company B, 16th North Carolina. At least I think it’s John Moore, here’s why…

Sgt Willie Meadows- Co B

unidentified Early War Photo, mislabeled as Willie Meadows, Co. B., 6th NCST

 

When I first saw this photo last week it was identified as Sergeant Willie Meadows of Company B, 6th North Carolina State Troops.

(see Sergeant Willie Meadows ?? Company B- “Flat River Guards”)

This didn’t seem right to me for several reasons. First the uniform was unlike any I had seen in previous photos of 6th NCST soldiers. Secondly, although he has a “B” on his cap, the letters “MR” below it didn’t make sense to me. Company B was known as the “Flat River Guards”. The letters on his cap should be FRG rather than the “MR”.

Corp Joseph C. Allison Co B 6ncst copy

Flat River Guards- “FRG” Hat Brass (Corporal Joseph C. Allison, Co B, 6th NCST)

Most viewers were in agreement that the picture seemed to be an early war photo, but looking up Willie Meadows service record revealed that he didn’t make Sergeant until 1864, much too late to be considered an “early war” photo.

When expert Bob Williams identified the “MR” as the 6th North Carolina’s Madison Rangers, I was further confused because I didn’t think there was any company called the Madison Rangers in the 6TH N. C.

I was wrong!

A little more research revealed that the Madison Rangers was indeed the nickname of the 6th North Carolina’s company B… the 6th North Carolina VOLUNTEERS, that is. They became the 16th North Carolina Troops on November 14, 1861.

Now that I established that this was not Willie Meadows, I wondered if there was any way to find out who this young man was. I sought the answer by consulting the roster for Company B, 16th NCT and identifying the Sergeants listed. I reasoned that he had to be one of them. There were only 7 sergeants listed, and four of them were named John, so there is a better than 50 % chance that the guy in the photo is John somebody!

If we agree that this is an early war photo, we can eliminate three names that didn’t become Sergeant until Dec ‘62 or later.

  • John W. Randall, 20, Promoted Sgt- 1 May ’63 
  • John Callahan, 29, Promoted Sgt- 22 Mar ’64 
  • Zachariah Peek, 25, Promoted 1st Sgt- 12 Dec ’62 

The lad in the photo is clearly in his mid 20’s, so that eliminates Sergeant John Brown, age 51.

Our sergeant is missing the diamond of a 1st Sergeant, so that eliminates 1st Sergeant Ira J. Profit, age 27.

This leaves us with two remaining choices:

Moore, John A., 1st Lt.
Resided in Madison County and enlisted at age 25, April 29, 1861. Mustered in as Sergeant and was elected 1st Lt. on or about April 26, 1862. Present or accounted for until killed at Chancellorsville, Va. May 3, 1863.

OR

Dalton, William A., Sergeant
Resided in Madison County where he enlisted on April 29, 1861. Mustered in as Sergeant but was reduced to rank of Corporal in September 1861-Feb 1863. Present or accounted for until captured in unspecified battle. Exchanged at Aiken’s Landing, James River, Va., Sept. 7, 1862. Reported AWOL from Nov. 11, 1862 through Aug 31, 1863. Reduced to Ranks prior to Sept 1, 1863. Company records do not indicate whether he ever returned to duty, however he DESERTED to the Yankees prior to March 5, 1865 when he took the Oath of allegiance at Louisville, Kentucky.

Hero or Traitor

Does the sincere face ln the photo look like a hero or a traitor? No disrespect meant to Sergeant Dalton, but, gee whiz, he seems to have a very spotty service record. Who knows what demons he faced during his service, but….AWOL? Desertion?

Whereas Sergeant Moore’s record is exemplary, including the fact that he made the ultimate sacrifice. So wouldn’t it be nice to remember him! That’s one reason I choose him.

Another reason is simple statistics. When 4 out of 7 sergeants are named John…well you can’t go wrong picking John, can you?

But the final data has nothing to do with something as arbitrary as personal feelings or as cold as statistics. What if we had a description? William Dalton has one in his compiled service record from his Oath of Allegiance:

Fold3_Page_3_Compiled_Service_Records_of_Confederate_Soldiers_Who_Served_in_Organizations_from_the_State_of_North_Carolina

Complexion: Fair
Hair: Light
Eyes: Blue
Height: 6’ 3”” (Wow! a giant!)

This doesn’t match our photo at all:

Sgt Willie Meadows- Co B

Sergeant John Moore, Co. B, Madison Rangers, 6th North Carolina Volunteers (16th NCT)

Complexion: dark (albeit with rosy cheeks)
Hair: Dark
Eyes: dark
Height: guessing about 5’11’’ (based on my height when I hold my sword that way)

This, then, has to be our guy…we have run out of choices!

Meet Sergeant…later 1st Lieutenant John Moore…unless you have a better idea?

Sergeant Willie Meadows ?? Company B- “Flat River Guards”

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The following photographs and information are original members of the “Bloody Sixth”. I am honored to include their stories and images here. If you would like to share a story or photo about your 6th NCST ancestor, please leave a comment and I will be in touch.


Sergeant Willie Meadows ??
Company B- “Flat River Guards”

Image found on the internet at various sites.

Discussion of photograph- Is this REALLY Willie Meadows?

At the time of this writing, this photograph has appeared in several places on the internet, some describing it  as the photo of Sgt. Willie Meadows. To date I have been unable to uncover the provenance that positively links this photo to this soldier, through a family member for example. One on-line auction site simply listed it as “Great Silhouetted Ninth Plate Ambrotype Of A Confederate Sergeant In Thermoplastic Case.”

According to Uniform expert Bob Williams, this image was once in the collection of William Albaugh and was published in. “Even More Confederate Faces” back in 1983. He is ID’d as belonging to the Madison Rangers, Co. B, 6th NCST.

There are several puzzling things about this photo. First is his forage Cap. It has a metal “B” which would correctly indicate his company, but below that are what appear to be “M R”.

Company B of the 6th North Carolina State Toops was known as the “Flat River Guards” and there are several photographs of their members wearing Hardee hats with the letters “FRG”.

Company B of the 6th North Carolina Infantry Volunteers (16th North Carolina Troops) was known as the “Madison Rangers”.  “M R” probably stands for Madison Rangers.

There was indeed a Willie Meadows in Company “B” of the 6th North Carolina State Troops, (see below) but his compiled service records show him as a private and a corporal, through 1864. He is listed as a Sergeant only on the Appomattox Parole listing in April of 1865.

That fact that the Cap has “hat brass” would indicate an early war photo. Veterans learned to remove these “targets” fairly early on. So while this would seem to be an early war photo, Willie Meadows of Company “B”, 6th NCST, was not a Sergeant until the late part of the war, and at that late date, its doubtful he had the proper uniform, anyway.

The upside down Sgt. Chevrons are unusual. While the jacket is similar to an early war NC style sack coat (fatigue jacket) it is not the same pattern. There are too many buttons, too close together and the black shoulder patches are going the wrong way, almost like officers shoulder boards.

A quick Google image search of “Civil War Sgt Chevrons” or “Civil War Sgt stripes” shows pages of photos, but none like the Sergeant stripes in this photo, making this pattern a mystery to me. I also scanned through Greg Mast’s “State Troops and Volunteers” and did not find a similar uniform jacket or upside down stripes amongst his many photos.

None of the known photographs of 6th North Carolina State Troops soldiers, especially several of the Flat River Guards, resemble this particular uniform.

I reviewed the 6th North Carolina Volunteers, which became the 16th NCT and found no Willie Meadows  on their roster. Additional reseach will be required to find out who the Sergeants of the 16th NCT were.

The etched sword, enhanced in the photo with added gilt, looks more like an officers sword, or maybe even a ceremonial sword. It could possibly be a photo studio prop, but he is wearing what appears to be a metal scabbard on this hip. This may be a little overkill for a prop.

His belt buckle is hidden by the sword, so no clue there and the buttons are obscured by the added gilt. Sadly there is no way to identify this as a North Carolina uniform, Much less as Willie Meadows.

If anyone can provide further explanation or provenance, I would love to share it with my readers.


Sergeant Willie Meadows  
Company B- “Flat River Guards”

Resided in: Orange County
Prior Occupation: unknown
Enlisted: May 1, 1861, for the war
Where: Orange County
Age at enlistment: 23
Rank at enlistment: Private
Service Record:

  • Note: he is listed as W., Willie, Wilie, and Wiley on the Compiled service records
  • Wounded in the leg at Malvern Hill, Virginia, July 1, 1862.
  • Appointed Corporal on April 1, 1863.
  • Captured at Fredericksburg, Vir­ginia, May 4, 1863, and confined at Fort Delaware, Delaware, until paroled and exchanged on May 23, 1863.
  • Captured at Rappahannock Station, Virginia, November 7, 1863, and confined at Point Lookout, Maryland, until paroled and transferred to Aiken’s Landing, James River, Virginia, Sep­tember 18, 1864, for exchange.
  • Paroled at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, April 9, 1865. Rank given on parole as Sergeant.

 


Source Notes:

1)  Jordon, “North Carolina Troops, 1861-1865

2) The National Archives Publication Number: M270; Publication Title: Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of North Carolina; National Archives Catalog ID: 586957; National Archives Catalog Title: Carded Records Showing Military Service of Soldiers Who Fought in Confederate Organizations , compiled 1903 – 1927, documenting the period 1861 – 1865; Record Group: 109;Roll: 0161; Military Unit: Sixth Infantry, North Carolina; Meadows, Willie

 

Additional information or photos would be welcomed to complete 
the record of this honorable soldier. 

Faces of the Sixth- Sgt. Bartlett Yancey Malone Co. H

 

Faces LogoThe following photographs and information are original members of the “Bloody Sixth”. I am honored to include their stories and images here. If you would like to share a story or photo about your 6th NCST ancestor, please leave a comment and I will be in touch.


Sgt. Bartlett Yancey Malone, Co. H

Sgt. Bartlett Yancey Malone, Co. H
source- “Whippt ’em Every Time”


B. Y. Malone was borned in the year of our Lord 1838 rased and graduated in the Corn field & Tobacco And inlisted in the war June the 18th 1861 And was a member of the Caswell Boys which was comanded by Capt Mitchel And 25 was attatched to the 6th N. C. Regt. which was comd by Coln Fisher who got kiled at the first Manassas fight which was fought July the 21st 1861.” From his diary

Best known as the author of the diary that was later published as “Whipt ‘Em Every Time“, Malone served in Co. H, “The Caswell Boys” commanded by Captain Alfred A.Mitchell.

Enlisted: June 6,1861 for the war

Where: Caswell County

Age at enlistment: 22

Pre-War Occupation: Farmer

Appointed Corporal: May/June 1861

Promoted to Sergeant: February 1, 1863

“The first day of February which was the Sabath was a pritty spring day.”

from his Diary (He doesn’t mention his promotion)

Wounded: Malvern Hill, Va. July 1, 1862

“And the next morning whitch was the first day of July just twelve months from the time I left home we crost over and about 10 oclock we overtaken the scamps again And they comenced throwing bumbs amung us And we amung them And thar was a very heavey canonading cept up all day And a little befour night the pickets comenced fyring And from that time untell about a hour in the night thar was very hard fiting don indeed And a great meney kild and wounded on boath sids in our company M. Miles L. Smith, B. Murphey, I. Calmond, G. Lyons And my self was all hurt”

from his diary

Wounded: Chancellorsville, Va., May 4, 1863

 “And the next day which was the 4 we was marching about first from one plais to a nother a watching the Yankees untell about a hour by sun and the fight was opend our Bregaid went in and charged about a half of a mile and just befour we got to the Yankee Battery I was slitley wounded above the eye with a peas of a Bumb”

from his diary

Captured: Rappahannock Station, Va. November 7, 1863

“And about dark the yanks charged on the Louisianna Bregaid which was clost to the Bridg and broke thir lines and got to the Bridge we was then cutoff and had to Surender”

from his diary

Confined: at Point Lookout Maryland

“The first day of July 1861 I left home, and the first day of July 1862 I was in the fight of Malvern Hill, and the first day of July 1863 I was in the fight at Gettysburg, and today which is the first day of July, I am at Point Lookout Md.”

from his diary

Paroled & Exchanged: Aikens Landing Va. Feb. 25-Mar. 3, 1865- Admitted to hospital in Richmond after being exchanged.

“The 21st all Prisnor capturd at Rappahanoc Station was cauld we all went out and Signed the Parole and was put in the Parole Camp and staid there most all the 24th then we was put on the Steamer George Leary we got to Fortress Monroe about dark And then run as far as Hampton Roads and there we staid all night Started next morning at light which was the 25 got to Acorns Landing about 10 Oclock which was about 12 miles from Richmond on the James River we then marched from there to Camp Lea we got to Camp Lea about dark We then Staid at Camp Lea untell the 27 when we wen over to Camp Winder.”

from his diary

Married: Mary Frances Compton (1842 – 1892) on 15 Nov 1866

Post War Occupation: Farmer

Death Date:  4 May 1890

Cemetery: Lynches Creek Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Corbett, Caswell County, North Carolina, USA


Source Notes:

1) Jordon, “North Carolina Troops, 1861-1865

2) Malone, Bartlett Yancey, and William Whatley Pierson. Whipt ’em everytime: the diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone. Wilmington, NC: Broadfoot, 1987.

3) North Carolina, Index to Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868

4) North Carolina, Marriage Records, 1741-2011

5 )Find A Grave: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgipage=gr&GRid=54151398&ref=acom

Additional information or photos would be welcomed to complete the record of this honorable soldier.

Faces of the Sixth- Private Anderson G. Gibbons Co. G

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The following photographs and information are original members of the “Bloody Sixth”. I am honored to include their stories and images here. If you would like to share a story or photo about your 6th NCST ancestor, please leave a comment and I will be in touch.


Private Anderson G. Gibbons
Company G

Anderson G Gibbons, Co G, 6th NCST

Source: Photo provided by descendant Gary Gibbons


Prior Occupation: Farmer

Enlisted: May 29, 1861,for the war.

Where: Mecklenburg County

Age at enlistment: 22

Wounded: South Mountain, Maryland, September 14, 1862.

Born in Davidson County and resided in Rowan County, he was present or accounted for until paroled at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, April 9, 1865. Took the Oath of Allegiance at Salisbury on June 3, 1865.


Source Notes:

1) Jordon, “North Carolina Troops, 1861-1865

 

Additional information or photos would be welcomed to complete
the record of this honorable soldier. 

Faces of the Sixth- Private William Thaddeus Redmond- Co. C

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The following photographs and information are original members of the “Bloody Sixth”. I am honored to include their stories and images here. If you would like to share a story or photo about your 6th NCST ancestor, please leave a comment and I will be in touch.

Private William Thaddeus Redmond
Company C

 


 

William Thaddeus (Thad) Redmond fought with Company “C” of the 6th North Carolina Troops. According to family lore, he was wounded in the right arm while carrying the colors. This photo was taken on his 83rd birthday in 1926. Thanks to Donnie Brogden of Durham, NC for supplying this picture of his cousin.

Enlisted: May 1, 1861 for the war

Where: Orange county (his residence)

Age at enlistment: 18

Wounded: Right Arm in Gettysburg, Pa. July 1, 1863

Promoted Corporal: Oct. 1, 1862

Promoted Sergeant: August 1 1863

 

Source Notes:

 

1) Jordon, “North Carolina Troops, 1861-1865

 

Additional information or photos would be welcomed to complete
the record of this honorable soldier. 

Faces of the Sixth-Private Henry Speck Harris Company B

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The following photographs and information are original members of the “Bloody Sixth”. I am honored to include their stories and images here. If you would like to share a story or photo about your 6th NCST ancestor, please leave a comment and I will be in touch.


Private Henry Speck Harris
Company B

p009_30534-5e

Image from a tintype. Collection 9. Neg. 100-54. UNC Collection
Photo Source: http://dc.lib.unc.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/dig_nccpa/id/5195/rec/7


 

Resided in : Granville County
Prior Occupation: Farmer
Enlisted: May 1, 1861, for the war
Where: Orange County
Age at enlistment: 22
Killed in Action: May 20, 1862
Buried: on the battlefield, unknown


Henry Speck Harris appears in the 1850 Federal Census living in the 1st district of the county of Orange. His father, Marcus, a 40 year old farmer and his mother, Louena, age 35, have 5 children living in their household.  Robert (16),  Archibald (14), Henry (12), Emeline(10) and Nathaniel (8). [1] I have been unable to locate a suitable match for him in the 1860 Census.

Henry Speck Harris was born at Bahama, N.C. on February 12, 1837.[2]

He Resided in Granville County and enlisted in Orange County at age 22, May 1, 1861, for the war. His Compiled Service record show him listed as “Present”  from the date of his enlistment on May 1, 1861 through  May 31, 1862 when he is listed as “Killed at Seven Pines, Virginia, May 31,1862.” [3][4]

The Chaplain of the regiment, K. Y. Stewart, D.D., wrote to the Raleigh Standard about the valor of the regiment and hardship they faced at the battle of Seven Pines, commending the conduct of the 6th N.C. Regiment:

“They stormed the enemy’s lines through an open field and exposed to a rapid fire from the works where they were posted. They charged and drove them from their camps—they ran them for a mile—they then twice charged their

masked works, wading through swamps up to the waist and that under a destructive fire until the approach of night and the absence of artillery, combined with the numbers of the enemy and strength of the works satisfied every one that nothing more could be done.”

1st Lt. B.R. Smith, Adjutant, 6th N.C.T. furnished a report to the newspaper and stated in a note to the editor [5]:

“The regiment was in advance and drove the enemy before them for a mile and a half, capturing their camps with large supplies and valuable property when they were met by large bodies of Federals entrenched with masked batteries. It was in charging these batteries twice that the chief losses were sustained.”

Total casualties for the battle below Richmond for the 6th NCST were

Killed- 11; Wounded-88; Missing-15; Aggregate loss-114 [6]

In this report H. S. Harris is listed as missing. Having fallen during the battle it is unclear if his body was ever recovered. His final resting place is unknown. His parents are buried at the Mount Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery,  located in Mangum Township (North Carolina) across from church at intersection of Bahama Road (SR 1616) and Quail Roost Road (SR 1615).

He was a member of the Flat River Guard (FRG on hat), which became Company B, Sixth North Carolina State Troops.


Source Notes:

1) Harris in the 1850 United States Federal Census; Year: 1850; Census Place: District 1, Orange, North Carolina; Roll: M432_639; Page: 255A; Image: 505, Reviewed by Researcher Frederick Walton on 7/13/2016 on Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

2) Harris Family Bible – Flat River, Orange County, NC; Author: Marcus Harris; Note: Marcus Harris, Salesman for American Bible Society Rainey M. Harris (Apr. 1991) discovered on Ancestry.com Harris Family Tree

3) Jordon, “North Carolina Troops, 1861-1865

4) The National Archives Publication Number: M270; Publication Title: Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of North Carolina; National Archives Catalog ID: 586957; National Archives Catalog Title: Carded Records Showing Military Service of Soldiers Who Fought in Confederate Organizations , compiled 1903 – 1927, documenting the period 1861 – 1865; Record Group: 109;Roll: 0161; Military Unit: Sixth Infantry, North Carolina; Harris, Henry S..

5) Both the Chaplain’s letter and the Adjutant’s report can be found in the newspaper- North Carolina Standard; Raleigh; June 18, 1862

6} The Richmond Daily Dispatch: June 9, 1862.

Additional information or photos would be welcomed to complete 
the record of this honorable soldier. 

Faces of the Sixth- The Barbee’s of Company I

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The following photographs and information are original members of the “Bloody Sixth”. I am honored to include their stories and images here. If you would like to share a story or photo about your 6th NCST ancestor, please leave a comment and I will be in touch.


The Barbee Brothers of Company I

The Barbee family appears in the 1860 Federal Census living in the eastern district of the county of Chatam. William, a 45 year old farmer and his wife Eliza, age 47, have 7 children living in their household.  Thomas (22),  Henry (21), Rufus (18), Cornelia (16), Ann (12), William (7) and Milly (5).

The three eldest brothers answered the call of the Confederacy. Only two survived. Here are their stories.


 

Corporal Thomas C. Barbee, Company I, Sixth North Carolina State Troops

Born: 16 April 1837
Prior Occupation: Farmer
Enlisted: May 28, 1861, for the war.
Where: Wake County (North Carolina Grays)
Age at enlistment: 24
Wounded: in leg at Gaines’ Mill, Virginia, June 27, 1862.
Paroled: Present or accounted for until paroled at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, April 9, 1865.

Corporal Thomas C. Barbee

Corporal Thomas C. Barbee (courtesy of descendant William O’Quinn)

Thomas C. Barbee (courtesy of descendant William O'Quinn)

Thomas C. Barbee with Paul Barbee circa 1890 (courtesy of descendant William O’Quinn)

 

Thomas enlisted in Wake County at age 24, May 28, 1861, for the war.  Brother Rufus, cousin Mordecai and himself are among 91 young men that joined the newly formed
“North Carolina Grays” that day in Morrisville, North Carolina. The members were mostly from  western Wake and Chatham counties and enlisted in Wake County on May 28, 1861. They went into the camp of instruction near Company Shops (Burlington), Alamance County, June 1, 1861, and were assigned to the 6th Regiment, North Carolina State troops as Company I.

Thomas mustered in as Private. He was wounded in the leg at Gaines’ Mill, Virginia, June 27, 1862. He was promoted to Corporal on August 1, 1863. He was present or accounted for until paroled at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, April 9, 1865.

Barbee Headstone

When he returned from the war He married Rebecca Trice on March 14, 1867. They had eight children, 5 sons and 3 daughters.

His farm was on the Barbee Road just below the Tyler Barbee estate. He was known by his family as William.

William Thomas Clingman Barbee died in 1903 and  is buried at Mt. Pisgah Baptist Church in Chatham County, North Carolina.


Sergeant Rufus Barbee, Company I, Sixth North Carolina State Troops

Thomas’ youngest military age  brother survived being a prisoner three times.

He was born February 26, 1842. He enlisted in Wake County when he was 19 years old with Thomas on May 28, 1861. He was mustered in as a private and was wounded at Seven Pines, Virginia on May 31, 1862, just 2 days after his brother Thomas. He was captured at South Mountain, Maryland on September 15, 1862 just as the battle of Sharpsburg was beginning. He was taken to Fort Delaware, Delaware, until he was paroled and transferred to Aiken’s Landing on the James River in Virginia on October 2, 1862 for exchange. He was declared exchanged on November 10, 1862.

Rufus Barbee in later Life (courtesy of descendant William O'Quinn)

Rufus Barbee in later Life (courtesy of descendant William O’Quinn)

Rufus was promoted to Corporal on December 1, 1862, and was promoted to Sergeant on January 1, 1863. He was captured at Strasburg, Virginia on September 22-23, 1864. He was taken to Point Lookout, Maryland where he was confined until paroled and transferred to Boulware’s Wharf on the James River on March 17, 1865 for exchange. He was in the hospital in Richmond where he was captured on April 3, 1865, and again transferred to Point Lookout on May 9,1865 and then paroled.

His Dec 2, 1925 Death Certificate shows he lived to be 82. He was Married To Adna Hudson. He was by occupation a Farmer. He lived in Morrisville in White Oak township his death.

He is buried on Davis Drive in the “Barbee Burying ground” about 1 mile from the Page house in Morrisville, where he marched of to war on a sunny spring day in 1861.


Henry B. Barbee Company I, Sixth North Carolina State Troops

Henry was the last brother belonging to  Company I. He enlisted in Chatham county, at age 22, on March 1, 1862 as a substitute for his father, William, who was in poor health.

He was admitted to General Hospital #12 in April 1862. Known as Banner Hospital, it was formerly the tobacco factory of William H. Grant. It had a Capacity over 250.It was located on the northeast corner of 19th and Franklin Streets in Richmond, Va.

We know only that, like so many others, he died of measles in Richmond on April
18, 1862. His final resting place in Richmond is in Oakwood Plot Section A, Row G, No. 2.  A large part of the interment in Oakwood consisted of three men to a plot.  The markers are impersonal small square stones about 6″ – 8″ square, and stand about 6″- 8″ high with the numbers on three sides of the stone.  No Photograph of him is known at this time.


3rd Lt. Mordecai B. Barbee, Co. I., was a cousin of these brothers. He enlisted in
Wake County and was appointed to the rank of 3rd Lieutenant of Company I on May 16, 1861. However, he resigned on October 4, 1862 “under charges of bad conduct at Seven Pines and Gaines Farm.”  His resignation was accepted on October 23, 1862.


 

Father William A. Barbee (1816-1907)

Like his sons, the elder Barbee enlisted on July 5, 1864 at age 47 in Company E, 6th Regiment North Carolina Senior Reserves. He was elected Lieutenant of the Company July 26, 1864. He served at Salisbury Union Prisoner of War Camp, Salisbury, NC. March 12,1865 hunting deserters in the mountains 20 miles west of the Yadkin River. He survived the war and is buried at Mt. Pisgah Baptist Church in Chatham County, North Carolina near his sons.


Source Notes:

1) Barbee in the 1860 United States Federal Census; Census Place: Eastern Division, Chatham, North Carolina; Roll: M653_892; Page: 2; Image: 48; Family History Library Film: 803892, Reviewed by Researcher Frederick Walton on 2/3/2016 on Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

2) Jordon, “North Carolina Troops, 1861-1865

3) “Thomas C. Barbe” in the North Carolina, Marriage Index 1741-2004, Reviewed by Researcher Frederick Walton on 2/4/2016, Ancestry.com. North Carolina, Marriage Index, 1741-2004 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.

4) Rufus Barbee, Wake, 1925, December, North Carolina, Death Certificates, 1909-1975, Ancestry.com,Reviewed by Researcher Frederick Walton on 2/4/2016 on Ancestry.com.

5) oral family history and Photographsj provided by descendant William O’Quinn.

Additional information or photos would be welcomed to complete the 
record of this honorable soldier. 

Faces of the Sixth- Pvt. John Wesley Knott

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The following photographs and information are original members of the “Bloody Sixth”. I am honored to include their stories and images here. If you would like to share a story or photo about your 6th NCST ancestor, please leave a comment and I will be in touch.


Pvt. John Wesley Knott
(spelled Nott on muster rolls)

Company A, Sixth North Carolina State Troops

Private John Wesley Knott Company A, Sixth North Carolina State Troops (Photo Courtesy of his descendant Bruce Zigler)

Private John Wesley Knott
Company A, Sixth North Carolina State Troops
(Photo courtesy of his descendant Bruce Zigler)

1905 John Knott

John W. Knott, 1905, age 62 (Photo courtesy of his descendant Bruce Zigler, this picture hangs in his Living Room)

Prior Occupation: Farmer
Enlisted: September 15, 1862
Where: Yadkin County
Age at enlistment: 18
Captured: Rappahannock Station, Va. November 7, 1863 & sent to Point Lookout, Md
Paroled: February 24, 1865 at Aikens Landing, Va. and appeared on the Hospital Muster at General Hospital Camp Winder, Richmond, Va. in March 1865.

John Wesley Knott was born on February 18, 1844 and lived near Bloomington, North Carolina by the Yadkin River. A note from Bruce Zigler’s Grandmother recalled -“He lived at Buffalo, NC, a little town East of Yadkinville. Went to Church at Enon, NC. I believe it was Baptist.”

Family lore recalls that the 18 year old farm boy was working in a field when a wagon load of soldiers came along and took him with them. His compiled service record indicates he was enlisted by a Col. of Militia, as a conscript.

He is listed on the Confederate Roll of Honor.

After the war he had nine boys and in the 1880’s moved to Champaign, Illinois. He died there on February 14, 1912. He is buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Urbana, Illinois, Champaign County – (Champaign, Illinois.)

Knott  Family

Bloom Family (Courtesy of Bruce Zigler)

Above is a family portrait of J. W. Knott’s family circa 1901-1902. His son Blum (or Bloom, named for Bloomington, N. C.) is seated far left in photo and is Bruce’s Great-Grandfather. Bloom’s daughter Bertha is Bruces’s Grandmother. She is seated on floor in front of John Knott – in Gray suit . John W. Knott also had a son named Avery – named in honor of  his Regimental and Brigade commander Colonel Isaac Erwin Avery.

 

Additional information or photos would be welcomed to complete the 
record of this honorable soldier.